Going Beyond Standard Exercise Guidelines May Add Years to Your Life

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
August 19, 2022

It’s not news that exercise is important for good health. Studies credit regular exercise with helping: 


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6 Things You Should Know About Strength Training / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / August 19, 2022

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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6 Things You Should Know About Strength Training

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
August 19, 2022

If you have gym rats in your life, they’ve probably flexed on the benefits of strength training —improved energy, greater stamina and better physique, among other benefits.

But strength training has benefits you (and your gym rat friends) might not realize – and it’s an important part of being.

Strength training in an umbrella term for a type of physical activity that makes your muscles work against some sort of resistance to facilitate muscle contractions, building muscle strength, size and endurance. 


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Going Beyond Standard Exercise Guidelines May Add Years to Your Life / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / August 19, 2022

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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New Study Finds Only One in Five American Adults Have Optimal Heart Health

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
August 26, 2022

Only about 20 percent of Americans have optimal heart health, according to a new study, which may help explain why heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S.

A research team led by Northwestern University recently took the pulse of overall heart health and found that only 1 in 5 Americans are doing the things they need to for their cardiovascular health.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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5 Nutrition Tips to Help Lower the Risk for Depression and Anxiety

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
August 26, 2022

Poor mental health is a significant problem in the U.S. In fact, about one in four American adults struggles with a mental health condition. Of all the mental health illnesses, anxiety is the most common, affecting 40 million adults. Depression -- also very common – touches nearly 21 million Americans. And about half the people suffering with anxiety also suffer with depression, and vice versa.

Effective treatment plans are available to help manage anxiety and depression. But instead of waiting to be diagnosed, you can take steps to help prevent it, such as:


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Waking Up One Hour Earlier Can Lower Depression / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / August 18, 2021
How Anxiety Affects Your Brain & Why Exercise Helps / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / July 23, 2018
Depression in Men Looks Different than It Does in Women / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / April 10, 2022

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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An Underactive Thyroid Has Ties to Dementia

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
August 26, 2022

Do you have an underactive thyroid? If yes, you may have an elevated risk of developing dementia as you age, particularly if you’re taking thyroid hormone replacement therapy, according to a study published in an online edition of Neurology. The study is observational, which means researchers didn’t find that low thyroid levels caused dementia, just that they were linked.


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Low Vitamin D Levels Linked to Dementia in Study

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
August 26, 2022

Vitamin D is a nutrient best known for its contributions to bone health. But it also regulates many other cellular functions and has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective properties, according to Mayo Clinic.

“Vitamin D is actually a hormone,” says Bernard Kaminetsky, MD, medical director, MDVIP. “And like most hormones, it has multiple important functions.”


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About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Recipes and Meal Plans

Whether you’re trying to prevent heart disease or manage it, we’ve got the recipe for you! In fact, we’ve got thousands of recipes that are heart-healthy, and they’re all on MDVIP Connect!


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What is Monkeypox?

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
August 5, 2022

Monkeypox has gotten a lot of media attention lately. But what is it?

Danish researchers first identified the monkeypox virus in 1958 in monkeys imported from Singapore. It wasn’t until 1970 that the first human case was diagnosed in the Democratic Republic of Congo, one of the 10 countries in western and central Africa where the virus became endemic. 


About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

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Understanding the Colors of Fat: How to Convert White to Brown Fat

Janet Tiberian Author
By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
July 11, 2022

The fat around your waist, snuggled up to your organs and clinging to your thighs and backside isn’t just a nuisance. It’s actually a remarkable component of your body composition. Fat has many benefits, such as giving you energy, manages cholesterol and blood pressure, helps escort some vitamins to the places they need to go and protecting your vital organs. 

But fat isn’t all one type or even one shade. Different types of body fat have different roles in your body – and they can cause different problems. Here’s what you need to know about fat. 


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Types of Fat: Good Fat vs. Bad Fat / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / May 2, 2018
Can Eating Too Much Dietary Fat Make Me Fat? / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / May 2, 2018
How Much Should I Weigh? / Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES / July 12, 2022

About the Author
Janet Tiberian Author
Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES

Janet Tiberian is MDVIP's health educator. She has more than 25 years experience in chronic disease prevention and therapeutic exercise.

View All Posts By Janet Tiberian, MA, MPH, CHES
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